healthcare

This blog series is a transcript of a recent interview I did as a speaker for Dr. Karen Wyatt's End-of-Life University. In our conversation we shared our own personal stories about death, transformation and the end of life. We also talked about our work in this realm, including my backstory on the documentary film Death Makes Life Possible, which will be world premiering at the Illuminate Film Festival in late May and also screened at the Afterlife Conference in early June. The beautiful web site for the movie will be launched very soon as well! Karen Wyatt: I wanted to start first...

Over the past few decades, the field of mind-body medicine has moved beyond the counter culture and into the mainstream. The scientific focus has shifted from the reductionistic view of health as a process based on discrete biological systems to a complex network of dynamic and interrelated systems. It involves the integration of the nervous, immune and endocrine systems, with insights from psychology and emotions research.  This field, that has become known as psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), was informed by the pioneering work of revolutionary scientists. Among them, pharmacologist Candace Pert helped add vital new perspectives on the model of health based...

 Adapted from the book Breast Cancer: Beyond Convention. This article, Chapter 12, written by Marilyn Schlitz, Ph.D., and Nola Lewis, M.S. Introduction, pg 315-7. People who face serious illness value their time in a new, more urgent way, and do not wish to waste it. If you are in treatment for breast cancer, you no doubt understand this very well. Like many women at this juncture, you may be feeling a greater-than-ever longing for a spiritual connection in your life. Illness often represents a spiritual turning point for patients, leading them to seek out new sources of comfort, strength, and purpose. It's too bad...

Adapted from the Preface to Consciousness & Healing: Integral Approaches to Mind-Body Medicine As we prepared this collection of essays, we identified the following as key tenets of the integral impulse currently emerging within modern healthcare.   Integral medicine does not just refer to the science of diagnosing, treating, or preventing disease and damage of the body or mind, but to a medicine that heals. It is a dynamic, holistic, life-long process that exists in widening and deepening relationships with self, culture, and nature. Integral medicine is about transformation, growth, and the restoration of wholeness. Health is seen not as the absence of disease, but...

[caption id="attachment_938" align="alignleft" width="233"] Shri Aurobindo (1872-1950)[/caption] Adapted from the Preface to Consciousness & Healing: Integral Approaches to Mind-Body Medicine While science has contributed to our understanding and treatment of disease, it has also served to limit the development of a model in which personal relationships, emotions, meaning, and belief systems are viewed as fundamental points of connection between body, mind, spirit, society, and nature. For increasing numbers of health-care consumers and professionals alike, the biomedical model fails to offer a system for understanding the fullness of lived experiences—minimizing or negating completely the possibility for human transcendence in the face of illness and...

Adapted from the Preface to Consciousness & Healing: Integral Approaches to Mind-Body Medicine Centuries ago, adventurers exploring the frontiers of our planet discovered, again and again, that they lived in a wider world than previously assumed. During this period, the art of map-making made tremendous strides. Fictitious lines of latitude and longitude became as important to navigators as the force of currents and the direction of winds. Perceptions of the world changed as new tools were discovered and new ideas unfolded. More recently, the quest to understand the universe and our place in it follows a similar pushing of boundaries with its...

by Marilyn Schlitz & Elizabeth Valentina Introduction Welcome to Part Three of three. In Part Two we reviewed 5 – 8 of twelve basic tools that are important in practicing whole person healthcare, based on the tremendous insights of health care practitioners. These include: cultivate loving kindness, model optimal health, develop a support system, and create healing rituals. Tools: 9 – 12 (visit Part One for 1 – 4; visit Part Two for 5 – 8) 9. Set intentions for optimal healing. Ask yourself, “What matters most?  What values do I want to adhere to?”  Based on these reflections, you can craft an...

by Marilyn Schlitz & Elizabeth Valentina Introduction Welcome back for Part Two of three. In Part One we reviewed 1 – 4 of twelve basic tools that are important in practicing whole person healthcare, based on the tremendous insights of health care practitioners. These included: examine your worldview, take an integral perspective, develop healing relationships, and deep listening. Tools: 5 – 8 5. Cultivate loving kindness. Many healing practitioners note that the greatest source of healing in the world is love.  Offering human to human, heart centered care is at the core of the healing relationship.  Delivering care with loving kindness may transform...

by Marilyn Schlitz & Elizabeth Valentina Introduction Great strides have been made in the study of whole person healthcare. Integrating body, mind and spirit has become a key dimension of health education, prevention and treatment. Despite many advances in a wide range of holistic approaches, however, our health care system remains primarily disease-centered rather than focused on the well-being of the whole person. To thrive as individuals and as communities of caring, we are called to develop an appreciation for both the inner wisdom of direct personal experiences of illness and health (your own and your patients), and for scientific and technological developments that...